The Pointless Century

S2E7 - Wilfred Owen vs. Siegfried Sassoon

Our first deep dive into First World War poetry considers the need to bear witness, the evolution of realism, the uses and problems of symbolism, anger at civilians, portrayals of mental illness, class, gender, disability, and the development of modernism. Anna judges Owen’s craft; Rachel veges out with Sassoon’s moth; Frank manages to only briefly mention sunrises and seems more interested in talking about rain; we all agree on the significance of these works but refuse to take these men as martyrs or sain

Episode Notes

S2 E7: Wilfred Owen vs. Siegfried Sassoon

*TW: graphic descriptions of war incl. homicide, suicide, corpses, etc.

Wilfred Owen – “Dulce et Decorum Est” https://www.poetryfoundation.org/poems/46560/dulce-et-decorum-est

Siegfried Sassoon – “ ‘Blighters’ ” https://www.poetryfoundation.org/poems/57215/blighters

Wilfred Owen – “The Sentry” https://poets.org/poem/sentry

Siegfried Sassoon – “Attack” https://www.poetryfoundation.org/poems/57323/attack-56d23aba391f5

Siegfried Sassoon – “Counter-Attack” https://www.poetryfoundation.org/poems/57220/counter-attack

Wilfred Owen – “S.I.W.” https://www.poetryfoundation.org/poems/57346/s-i-w

Siegfried Sassoon – “On Passing the New Menin Gate” https://allpoetry.com/On-Passing-The-New-Menin-Gate

Wilfred Owen – “Insensibility” https://www.poetryfoundation.org/poems/57258/insensibility

Siegfried Sassoon – “Repression of War Experience” https://www.poetryfoundation.org/poems/57267/repression-of-war-experience

Wilfred Owen – “Disabled” https://www.poetryfoundation.org/poems/57285/disabled

Our first deep dive into First World War poetry considers the need to bear witness, the evolution of realism, the uses and problems of symbolism, anger at civilians, portrayals of mental illness, class, gender, disability, and the development of modernism. Anna judges Owen’s craft; Rachel veges out with Sassoon’s moth; Frank manages to only briefly mention sunrises and seems more interested in talking about rain; we all agree on the significance of these works but refuse to take these men as martyrs or saints.

CORRECTION: At one point, Frank uses the term "Edwardian" when he probably means to say "Georgian." As an Americanist, it's a bit tricky to keep track of artistic distinctions based on the names of British kings.

REFERENCES and further reading:

Caesar, Adrian. “The ‘Human Problem’ in Wilfred Owen’s Poetry.” Critical Quarterly, vol. 29, no. 2, June 1987, pp. 67-84.

Fussell, Paul. The Great War and Modern Memory. Oxford, 1975.

Hibberd, Dominic. Owen the Poet. U of Georgia, 1986.

Hibberd, Dominic. Wilfred Owen: The Last Year (1917-1918). Constable, 1992.

March, William. Company K. 1933. U of Alabama, 1989.

Owen, Wilfred. The Poems of Wilfred Owen. Edited by Edmund Blunden, 1931. New Classics, 1949.

Owen, Wilfred. The Poems of Wilfred Owen. Edited by Jon Stallworthy. Norton, 1986.

Pope, Jessie. War Poems. Grant Richards, 1915. https://www.bl.uk/collection-items/jessie-popes-war-poems

Sassoon, Siegfried. Counter-Attack and Other Poems. William Heinemann, 1918. https://www.bl.uk/collection-items/counter-attack-and-other-poems-by-siegfried-sassoon

Sassoon, Siegfried. The Old Huntsman and Other Poems. William Heinemann, 1917. https://www.bl.uk/collection-items/the-old-huntsman-by-siegfried-sassoon

The Pointless Crew: Frank Fucile (he/him/his) – Lit & Theory, Film & Media, Genre, Enviro & Tech Studies // Anna Wendorff (she/her/hers) – Communications, Rhetorics of Sci & Tech, Feminism // Rachel Hamele (she/her/hers) – History, Humanities, Queer Studies, Fandoms // Madalyn McCabe (she/her/hers) – Sound Editing, French, European Studies

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MUSIC: Refused – “Last Minute Pointer” & “The Slayer” from Songs to Fan the Flames of Discontent (Victory/Burning Heart, 1996)

ART: Paul Nash, We Are Making a New World. Oil on canvas, 1918. Imperial War Museum.

The Manchester Regiment at Serre, France, March 1917.

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S2E6 - M (1931) / Psycho (1960)

Matthew S. Wise talks about the evolution of the horror genre; we all agree that these great films productively question the usefulness of the police; but Frank then explains how one might be secretly or accidentally fascist.

Episode Notes

M, film still feat. Gustaf Gründgens (Nero-Film, 1931) S2 E6: M (1931) / Psycho (1960)

*TW: murder, implied sexual assault

M. Dir. Fritz Lang. Writ. Fritz Lang, Thea von Harbou. Perf. Peter Lorre, Otto Wernicke, Gustaf Gründgens. Nero-Film, 1931.

Ménilmontant. Dir. Dimitri Kirsanoff. Perf. Nadia Sibirskaïa, Yolande Beaulieu, Guy Belmont. 1926.

Hereditary. Dir. Ari Aster. Perf. Toni Collette, Milly Shapiro, Gabriel Byrne. A24, 2018.

Psycho. Dir. Alfred Hitchcock. Perf. Janet Leigh, Pat Hitchcock, Vera Miles, John Gavin, Martin Balsam, Anthony Perkins. Paramount, 1960.

Matthew S. Wise talks about the evolution of the horror genre; we all agree that these great films productively question the usefulness of the police; but Frank then explains how one might be secretly or accidentally fascist.

The Pointless Crew: Matthew S. Wise (he/him/his) – Author of the poetry collection Everything Is Ed Wood // Frank Fucile (he/him/his) – Lit & Theory, Film & Media, Genre, Enviro & Tech Studies // Anna Wendorff (she/her/hers) – Communications, Rhetorics of Sci & Tech, Feminism // Rachel Hamele (she/her/hers) – History, Humanities, Queer Studies, Fandoms // Madalyn McCabe (she/her/hers) – Sound Editing, French, European Studies

CLARIFICATIONS: Frank and Anna refer obliquely to Hitchcock’s and Lang’s notorious treatment of their actors. See Robert Evans’s Behind the Bastards for two episodes dealing with Hitchcock’s pranks and his treatment of leading women specifically. Plenty of anecdotes about Lang are also accessible online, and his treatment of Brigitte Helm on the set of Metropolis was mentioned in S2E4. Frank suggests that Lang may have practiced some forms of non-vanilla sexuality, but other sources claim that Lang fled Nazi Germany because his mother was ethnically Jewish (though she had converted and raised him as a Catholic).

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MUSIC: Refused – “Worms of the Senses / Faculties of the Skull” from The Shape of Punk to Come (Burning Heart, 1998)

Cardiel – “Sheriff Hernandez” from Local Solo (La Roma, 2014)

ART: Paul Nash, We Are Making a New World. Oil on canvas, 1918. Imperial War Museum.

M, film still feat. Gustaf Gründgens (Nero-Film, 1931)

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S2E5 - Sylvia Plath vs. Allen Ginsberg

*TW: suicide, self-harm, mental illness / Rachel wrestles with long lines; Anna disses silly rhymes; Frank reflects on old times and somehow compares the 90s to the 50s.

Episode Notes

S2 E5: Sylvia Plath vs. Allen Ginsberg

*TW: suicide, self-harm, mental illness

Rachel wrestles with long lines; Anna disses silly rhymes; Frank reflects on old times and somehow compares the 90s to the 50s; we all appreciate these lyric efforts to rise above the conformity of the era but find ourselves critiquing both form and philosophy.

Sylvia Plath - “The Colossus” (1957) from The Colossus and Other Poems (Heinemann, 1960) https://www.poetryfoundation.org/poems/89119/the-colossus

Sylvia Plath - “Lady Lazarus” (1960) from Ariel (Faber & Faber, 1965) https://www.poetryfoundation.org/poems/49000/lady-lazarus

Sylvia Plath - “Daddy” (1960) from Ariel (Faber & Faber, 1965) https://www.poetryfoundation.org/poems/48999/daddy-56d22aafa45b2

Allen Ginsberg - “America” (1956) from Howl and Other Poems (City Lights, 1956) https://www.poetryfoundation.org/poems/49305/america-56d22b41f119f

Allen Ginsberg - “Howl” (1955-56) from Howl and Other Poems (City Lights, 1956) https://www.poetryfoundation.org/poems/49303/howl

Allen Ginsberg - “Footnote to Howl” (1955) from Howl and Other Poems (City Lights, 1956) https://www.poetryfoundation.org/poems/54163/footnote-to-howl

MINOR CORRECTIONS/NOTES: Frank refers to “the 1950s” in his intro, which he claims lasts from 1953-1964. Sylvia Plath committed suicide in 1963. Rachel keeps referring to Sylvia Plath’s family as “Austrian” in the recording. Plath’s father was born in Grabow, Germany – the name of which is from the Polabian language, hence the reference to its ambiguous origin in “Daddy.” Plath’s maternal grandparents were from Austria. Plath was born in Boston and lived most of her life there and in London, England.

The Pointless Crew: Frank Fucile (he/him/his) – Lit & Theory, Film & Media, Genre, Enviro & Tech Studies // Anna Wendorff (she/her/hers) – Communications, Rhetorics of Sci & Tech, Feminism // Rachel Hamele (she/her/hers) – History, Humanities, Queer Studies, Fandoms // Madalyn McCabe (she/her/hers) – Sound Editing, French, European Studies

// T-shirts are now available: http://www.teepublic.com/user/the-pointless-century // Watch us on Instagram: @thePointlessCentury // Troll us on Twitter: @PointlessCent

MUSIC: Refused – “Worms of the Senses / Faculties of the Skull” from The Shape of Punk to Come (Burning Heart, 1998)

Sleater-Kinney – “Call the Doctor” from Call the Doctor (Chainsaw, 1996)

ART: Paul Nash, We Are Making a New World. Oil on canvas, 1918. Imperial War Museum.

Metropolis, film still (UFA, 1927)

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Wes Anderson

Anna tells us about a children’s movie she loves; Madalyn meditates on Steve Zissou; Frank explains how culture makes money sexy; we all agree Wes Anderson’s films are enjoyable, but we admit there aren’t many actual LOLs

Episode Notes

S2 Extra Episode (Anna’s Choice): Wes Anderson

In a slightly less depressing episode than usual, Anna tells us about a children’s movie she loves; Madalyn meditates on Steve Zissou; Frank explains how culture makes money sexy; we all agree Wes Anderson’s films are enjoyable, but we admit there aren’t many actual LOLs. Rachel was studying for an exam and will join us next time.

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The Pointless Crew: Anna Wendorff (she/her/hers) – Communications, Rhetorics of Sci & Tech, Feminism // Frank Fucile (he/him/his) – Lit & Theory, Film & Media, Genre, Enviro & Tech Studies // Madalyn McCabe (she/her/hers) – Sound Editing, French, European Studies

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S2E4 - The Monstrous 20s (pt. 2)

We reflect on the Jan. 6 coup attempt; Frank then lectures on the Culture Industry; Rachel ponders the multiple versions of Phantom of the Opera; Anna rips on another cheesy ending; we all marvel at the work of Lon Chaney and Brigitte Helm but are left wondering why Conrad Veidt’s performance ended up being so influential.

Episode Notes

S2 E4: The Monstrous 20s (pt. 2)

The Phantom of the Opera. Dir. Rupert Julian. Writ. Gaston Leroux. Prod. Carl Laemmle. Perf. Lon Chaney, Mary Philbin. Universal, 1925.

Metropolis. Dir. Fritz Lang. Writ. Thea von Harbou. Perf. Brigitte Helm, Alfred Abel, Gustav Fröhlich. UFA, 1927.

The Man Who Laughs. Dir. Paul Leni. Writ. Victor Hugo, J. Grubb Alexander. Perf. Conrad Veidt, Mary Philbin. Universal, 1928.

This late follow-up to our last episode of 2020, starts with some reflections on the Jan. 6 coup attempt; Frank then lectures on the Culture Industry; Rachel ponders the multiple versions of Phantom of the Opera; Anna rips on another cheesy ending; we all marvel at the work of Lon Chaney and Brigitte Helm but are left wondering why Conrad Veidt’s very restricted performance in The Man Who Laughs ended up being so influential.

[Shout-outs to Robert Evans (@IwriteOK / @BastardsPod) and Scott Poole (@MonstersAmerica)] // T-shirts are now available: http://www.teepublic.com/user/the-pointless-century // Watch us on Instagram: @thePointlessCentury // Troll us on Twitter: @PointlessCent

CORRECTION: Frank identifies the law enforcement officer who shot and killed an insurrectionist in the Capitol as a Secret Service agent, but that person was actually a Capitol Police officer.

The Pointless Crew: Frank Fucile (he/him/his) – Lit & Theory, Film & Media, Genre, Enviro & Tech Studies // Anna Wendorff (she/her/hers) – Communications, Rhetorics of Sci & Tech, Feminism // Rachel Hamele (she/her/hers) – History, Humanities, Queer Studies, Fandoms // Madalyn McCabe (she/her/hers) – Sound Editing, French, European Studies

REFERENCES:

Elsaesser, Thomas. Weimar Cinema and After: Germany’s Historical Imaginary. Routledge, 2000.

Horkheimer, Max & Theodor Adorno. The Dialectic of Enlightenment, ed. Gunzelin Schmid Noerr, trans. Edmund Jephcott. Stanford, 2002.

Kracauer, Siegfried. From Caligari to Hitler: A Psychological History of the German Film. Princeton, 1947.

Poole, W. Scott. Wasteland: The Great War and the Origins of Modern Horror. Counterpoint, 2019.

MUSIC: The Melvins – “Vile” from Ozma (Boner, 1989)

Fantômas – “Der Golem” (written by Karl Ernst Sasse) from The Director’s Cut (Ipecac, 2001)

ART: Paul Nash, We Are Making a New World. Oil on canvas, 1918. Imperial War Museum.

The Man Who Laughs, film still feat. Conrad Veidt (Universal, 1928)

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S2E3 - The Monstrous 20s (pt. 1)

Rachel complains about pacing; Anna rants about the wrong movie; Frank compares Rambo to Charlie Kelly; and Madalyn does an excellent job of editing together a long and rambling set of conversations.

Episode Notes

S2 E3: The Monstrous 20s (pt. 1)

The Penalty. Dir. Wallace Worsley. Writ. Gouverneur Morris. Perf. Lon Chaney. Goldwyn, 1920.

Nosferatu. Dir. F.W. Murnau. Perf. Max Schreck, Gustave von Wagenheim, Greta Schröder. JABJ, 1922.

Waxworks. Dir. Paul Leni & Leo Birinsky. Writ. Henrik Galeen. Perf. Emil Jannings, Conrad Veidt, Werner Krauss, William Dieterle. Neptune, 1924.

In the first installment of a two-part series, Rachel complains about pacing; Anna rants about the wrong movie; Frank compares Rambo to Charlie Kelly; and Madalyn does an excellent job of editing together a long and rambling set of conversations about power-mad tyrants, disfigured geniuses, subhuman predators, empty husks of human flesh, the invention of genre cinema, (as always) the First World War, & (inevitably) fascism. // T-shirts are now available: http://tee.pub/lic/1yd0lBadbP4

// Watch us on Instagram: @thePointlessCentury // Troll us on Twitter: @PointlessCent

The Pointless Crew: Frank Fucile (he/him/his) – Lit & Theory, Film & Media, Genre, Enviro & Tech Studies // Anna Wendorff (she/her/hers) – Communications, Rhetorics of Sci & Tech, Feminism // Rachel Hamele (she/her/hers) – History, Humanities, Queer Studies, Fandoms // Madalyn McCabe (she/her/hers) – Sound Editing, French, European Studies

REFERENCES:

Elsaesser, Thomas. Weimar Cinema and After: Germany’s Historical Imaginary. Routledge, 2000.

Fussell, Paul. Class: A Guide through the American Status System. Simon & Schuster, 1983.

Horkheimer, Max & Theodor Adorno. The Dialectic of Enlightenment, ed. Gunzelin Schmid Noerr, trans. Edmund Jephcott. Stanford, 2002.

Kracauer, Siegfried. From Caligari to Hitler: A Psychological History of the German Film. Princeton, 1947.

Poole, W. Scott. Wasteland: The Great War and the Origins of Modern Horror. Counterpoint, 2019.

MUSIC: The Melvins – “Vile” from Ozma (Boner, 1989)

Fantômas – “Der Golem” (written by Karl Ernst Sasse) from The Director’s Cut (Ipecac, 2001)

ART: Paul Nash, We Are Making a New World. Oil on canvas, 1918. Imperial War Museum.

Albin Grau, promotional poster for Nosferatu, 1922.

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S2E2 - Paths of Glory / A Very Long Engagement

Anna enjoys vengeance; Rachel denounces injustice; Frank lectures even more than usual; we continue to ponder the concept of realism in genre film; and we all stare exhausted down the barrel of the gun that is the state.

Episode Notes

S2 E2: Paths of Glory / A Very Long Engagement

In our second look at great films of the Great War, Anna enjoys vengeance; Rachel denounces injustice; Frank lectures even more than usual; we continue to ponder the concept of realism in genre film; and we all stare exhausted down the barrel of the gun that is the state. // Watch us on Instagram: @thePointlessCentury // Troll us on Twitter: @PointlessCent

KEY FILMS REFERENCED: Fear and Desire. Dir. Stanley Kubrick. Perf. Frank Silvera, Kenneth Harp. Kubrick Family, 1953.

Un long dimanche de fiançailles [A Very Long Engagement]. Dir. Jean-Pierre Jeunet. Perf. Audrey Tautou, Gaspard Ulliel, Jodie Foster, Marion Cotillard. Warner Bros, 2004.

Paths of Glory. Dir. Stanley Kubrick. Perf. Kirk Douglas, George Macready, Ralph Meeker, Joe Turkel, Adolphe Menjou. United Artists, 1957.

The Pointless Crew: Frank Fucile (he/him/his) – Lit & Theory, Film & Media, Genre, Enviro & Tech Studies // Anna Wendorff (she/her/hers) – Communications, Rhetorics of Sci & Tech, Feminism // Rachel Hamele (she/her/hers) – History, Humanities, Queer Studies, Fandoms // Madalyn McCabe (she/her/hers) – Sound Editing, French, European Studies

MUSIC: The Melvins – “Sacrifice” (written by Will Shatter) from Lysol (Boner, 1992)

Refused – “Lick it Clean” (c. 1992)

ART: Paul Nash, We Are Making a New World. Oil on canvas, 1918. Imperial War Museum.

Paths of Glory, promotional poster feat. Kirk Douglas (UA, 1957).

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S2E1 - The Big Parade / 1917

Rachel dreams of reality; Anna wonders whether anti-war movies are really possible; Frank gives an extended description of 1920s special effects; we all agree that the common vernacular of film has changed immensely in 95 years but still manage to find common threads in the genres and narratives that have evolved over that time.

Episode Notes

S2 E1: The Big Parade / 1917

Rachel dreams of reality; Anna wonders whether anti-war movies are really possible; Frank gives an extended description of 1920s special effects; we all agree that the common vernacular of film has changed immensely in 95 years but still manage to find common threads in the genres and narratives that have evolved over that time.

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1917 . Dir. Sam Mendes, Perf. Dean-Charles Chapman, George MacKay, Colin Firth, Benedict Cumberbatch. Dreamworks, 2019.

The Big Parade. Dir. King Vidor, Writ. Lawrence Stallings, Perf. John Gilbert, Renée Adorée, Tom O’Brien, Karl Dane. MGM, 1925.

March, William. Company K. (1933) U of Alabama, 1989.

They Shall Not Grow Old. Dir. Peter Jackson. House / Imperial War Museum, 2018.

The Pointless Crew: Frank Fucile (he/him/his) – Lit & Theory, Film & Media, Genre, Enviro & Tech Studies // Anna Wendorff (she/her/hers) – Communications, Rhetorics of Sci & Tech, Feminism // Rachel Hamele (she/her/hers) – History, Humanities, Queer Studies, Fandoms // Madalyn McCabe (she/her/hers) – Sound Editing, French, European Studies

MUSIC: The (International) Noise Conspiracy – “Last Century Promise” from New Morning…Changing Weather (Burning Heart/Epitaph, 2001)

Refused – “Servants of Death” from Freedom (Epitaph, 2015)

ART: Gustave Moreau, Helen at the Scaen Gate, oil on canvas (Paris, 1880s)

The Big Parade, film still feat. John Gilbert (MGM, 1925)

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S1E8 - Gustave Moreau vs. Cy Twombly

Anna describes 19th century brushstrokes; Rachel gets angry at ten paintings; and Frank tells a story that takes 140 years; we all puzzle over these things people use to decorate museum walls and welcome Madalyn, our new editor and occasional pronunciation coach.

Episode Notes

Episode 8: Gustave Moreau vs. Cy Twombly

In our season finale, Anna describes 19th century brushstrokes; Rachel gets angry at ten paintings; and Frank tells a story that takes 140 years; we all puzzle over these things people use to decorate museum walls and welcome Madalyn, our new editor and occasional pronunciation coach. Future episodes should be released on a more consistent, bi-weekly basis. BTW our Patreon still exists!

// T-shirts are now available: http://tee.pub/lic/1yd0lBadbP4

The Pointless Crew: Anna Wendorff (she/her/hers) – Communications, Rhetorics of Sci & Tech, Feminism // Rachel Hamele (she/her/hers) – History, Humanities, Queer Studies, Fandoms // Frank Fucile (he/him/his) – Lit & Theory, Film & Media, Genre, Enviro & Tech Studies // Madalyn McCabe (she/her/hers) – Sound Editing, French, European Studies

ART LINKS: Gustave Moreau, Helen at the Scaean Gate. Oil on canvas, c. 1885. Gustave Moreau Museum, Paris. https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Helene_a_la_porte_scee_-gustave_moreau-_2.jpg

Gustave Moreau, Helen on the Walls of Troy. Watercolor, c. 1885. https://www.wikiart.org/en/gustave-moreau/helen-on-the-walls-of-troy

Cy Twombly, Fifty Days at Iliam. Oil, pencil, and wax crayon on canvas, 1977-78. Philadelphia Museum of Art. https://www.philamuseum.org/collections/permanent/85709.html?mulR=448111926|1

Cy Twombly, Nine Discourses on Commodus. Oil, pencil, and wax crayon on canvas, 1963. Guggenheim Museum Bilbao. https://www.guggenheim-bilbao.eus/en/the-collection/works/nine-discourses-on-commodus

REFERENCES:

Di Via, Richard. “Is Man, by Nature, a Violent Being? (A Philosophical Look at Cy Twombly’s 50 Days at Iliam).” The Art of Seeing—Explore Works from Philadelphia’s Museum of Art, posted by Meighan Maley, 11 Aug. 2019. https://meighanmaley.com/2019/08/11/is-man-by-nature-a-violent-being-a-philosophical-look-at-cy-twomblys-50-days-of-iliam/

Jones, Jonathan. “Cy Twombly Review – Blood-Soaked Coronation for a Misunderstood Master,” The Guardian, 30 Nov. 2016. https://www.theguardian.com/artanddesign/2016/nov/30/cy-twombly-review-centre-pompidou-paris

Mercer, Kevin. “The Most Important Paintings I’ve ever Seen.” 17 Sept. 2014. http://www.thelargemammal.com/blog/2014/9/17/the-most-important-paintings-ive-ever-seen

MUSIC: The (International) Noise Conspiracy – “Last Century Promise” from New Morning…Changing Weather (Burning Heart/Epitaph, 2001)

Refused – “Elektra” from Freedom (Epitaph, 2015)

Sonic Youth – “Shaking Hell” from Kill Yr Idols (Zensor, 1983)

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S1E7 - Novecento (1900) Pt 3 *TW

Anna complains about a whole block of cheese; Rachel laments an exploiter’s impoliteness; and Frank tells a long-winded story about a communist physics teacher smoking in his parents’ driveway; we all grumble about our nation’s own slide into fascism and try to learn something in the meantime.

Episode Notes

Episode 7: Novecento (1900) Pt 3

Novecento [1900]. Dir. Bernardo Bertolucci. Perf. Robert De Niro, Gérard Depardieu, Dominique Sanda, Sterling Hayden, Stefania Sandrelli, Donald Sutherland, Burt Lancaster. 20th Century Fox, 1976.

*TW: sexual coercion, suicide, excrement

In the final installment of a 3-part series, Anna complains about a whole block of cheese; Rachel laments an exploiter’s impoliteness; and Frank tells a long-winded story about a communist physics teacher smoking in his parents’ driveway; we all grumble about our nation’s own slide into fascism and try to learn something in the meantime. Future episodes will have an actual editor, and our TeePublic site will launch eventually.

The Pointless Crew: Anna Wendorff (she/her/hers) – Communications, Rhetorics of Sci & Tech, Feminism Rachel Hamele (she/her/hers) – History, Humanities, Queer Studies, Fandoms Frank Fucile (he/him/his) – Lit & Theory, Film & Media, Genre, Enviro & Tech Studies

MUSIC: Refused – “The Infamous Left” & “The Refused Party Program” Stereolab – “Ping Pong”

ART: Gustave Moreau, Helen at the Scaen Gate, oil on canvas (Paris, 1880s)

Giuseppe Pellizza da Volpedo, The Fourth Estate (a.k.a. The Path of Workers), oil on canvas (Turin?, c.1901)

Find out more at https://the-pointless-century.pinecast.co

The Pointless Century is a podcast of informal discussions about literature and film seeking to understand 20th century history and illuminate 21st century politics. Professor Frank Fucile and research assistants Anna Wendorff and Rachel Hamele work their way through comparative studies of canonical works, examples from pop culture, and some cult classics while reflecting on subjects like technology, art, class, race, gender, sexuality, the environment, (as always) war, and (inevitably) fascism.